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End of the Year Organization Tips for Special Education

Let's face it, the end of the year is CRAZY! The last thing I really want to think about is organization at the end of the school year. I've been trying to keep it together all year, you're probably ready to shove everything in my cabinet, throw your hands in the air, and leave for the next 2 months. I know I've felt that way when the end of the school year draws near, but I've realized that having an organization plan for the end of the year not only closes out this school year nicely, but it also helps me prepare for the next school year before it even starts.
Let's face it, the end of the year is CRAZY! The last thing I really want to think about is organization at the end of the school year. I've been trying to keep it together all year, you're probably ready to shove everything in my cabinet, throw your hands in the air, and leave for the next 2 months. I know I've felt that way when the end of the school year draws near, but I've realized that having an organization plan for the end of the year not only closes out this school year nicely, but it also helps me prepare for the next school year before it even starts.

These four quick tips are going to help you do just that. These are the tried and true tips I use to make sure this school year is wrapped up neatly and I'm ready to get up and go for the next school year.

3 Ways to Increase Communication Opportunities Throughout the Day

Building communication opportunities for our students is important. I know in my classroom, we're constantly working on requesting different items to expand our vocabulary, utterances, or sentence complexity. These 3 quick and easy tips are going to help you increase the opportunities for communication in your classroom EVERYDAY.

Data Collection Series: Where should I keep data sheets?

Are you wondering where you should store your data sheets to ensure data is being collected frequently in your special education classroom? Find out where I store data sheets and get maximum data collection from all of my staff.

I'm back talking about data collection in the classroom. We've talked about what skills you should be collecting data on and how to choose the right data sheets. Now it's time to talk about where you're going to store all these data sheets.

Work Tasks for Beginning Readers

Have students who are just building their reading skills? I've gathered some of my very favorite work tasks for students just learning letter sounds to students who are reading and comprehending at the sentence level. Check out these quick and easy tasks for beginning readers.

Data Collection Series: Choosing the right data sheets

So now that you're all set on what you should be taking data on in your classroom. It's time to figure out how to collect said data. There are a few quick and easy ways I like to collect data in my classroom and I want to show you some of my favorite data sheets.

The first thing I do when determining the data sheets to use in my classroom is to look at the goal I measuring. Am I measuring independence? Accuracy? Behavior? Frequency? Determining what I am measuring will help me determine which data sheet would best work to measure my students goals.

Data Collection Series: What should I take data on?

Data, all day, every day. I'm sure you're taking a TON of data in your Special Education classroom. I take data on #allthethings in my classroom, too. But I remember when I started out in my classroom and I would wonder "What data do I need to be collecting?" So with all that fear of missing something important. I literally took data on EVERYTHING. There were so many data sheets that I honestly never looked at them. I mean, who has time for that?

I mean, seriously, did I need data for all of my students multiple trips to the bathroom each day? Probably not since 6 out of my 8 students were completely toilet trained by the time they came to my classroom. Did I need data on every response my students provided during our morning circle time? Again, probably not. But did I need data on the attending goals my students had? Absolutely! Once I had time to step away and think about it, it was clear that I didn't need to take data on #allthethings. I knew I needed to analyze what I was doing and find a way to do it better.

No SMART Board? No Problem!

Is your classroom lacking in the technology department? I get so jealous when I see classrooms with interactive whiteboards and real 21st century equipment. It's easy to feel like you're living in the Stone Age when you see people all over with interactive whiteboards and amazing technology in their classrooms. Trust me, I'm with you there.

Giving my students experience with technology is important to me. We live in a world full of technology and our students need to be prepared and know how to interact with it, and let's face it, there is some super cool stuff you can do with great technology in the classroom. But unfortunately my classroom is more equipped for prehistoric times than present times. I wanted to use what I had in my classroom to build an experience for my students. Check out what I did!
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